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Pediatrics. 2014 May;133(5):e1258-67. doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-1416.

Public perceptions of pharmacogenetics.

Author information

1
Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, and.
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
3
Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, and Departments of Pediatrics, Physiology and Pharmacology, and Medicine, and University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada; and mrieder@uwo.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Pharmacogenetics (PGx) promises to optimize patient response to therapy. However, the public's acceptance of PGx is not well known, notably when this applies to children. Our objective was to explore perceptions of PGx testing among individuals, who differ from each other by either parental status or educational exposure to PGx, and to explore parents' views between PGx testing for oneself and PGx testing for their children.

METHODS:

An exploratory survey was conducted among parents and other adults. Surveys P and C were completed by parents, survey NP by middle-aged nonparents, and survey MS by medical students.

RESULTS:

Proper explanation before PGx testing appeared to be the most important issue to the respondents (eg, P = 1.55 × 10(-38) for survey NP). Respondents who were more knowledgeable about PGx were also more comfortable with PGx testing (eg, P = 2.53 × 10(-7) in case of mild disease). When PGx testing was for one's child, parents valued their own understanding more than their child's assent (P = 1.57 × 10(-17)).

CONCLUSIONS:

The acceptability of PGx testing, either for oneself or for one's child, seemed to depend on baseline PGx knowledge, but not on parenthood.

KEYWORDS:

child; parents; pharmacogenetics; public opinion

PMID:
24777223
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2013-1416
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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