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Nat Methods. 2014 Jun;11(6):629-32. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.2935. Epub 2014 Apr 28.

Olfactory exposure to males, including men, causes stress and related analgesia in rodents.

Author information

1
1] Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. [2] Department of Psychology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. [3].
2
1] Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. [2].
3
Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
4
Department of Psychology, Haverford College, Haverford, Pennsylvania, USA.
5
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Department of Psychology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.
7
1] Research Centre, Sacré Coeur Hospital, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. [2] Centre de Recherche en Neuropsychologie et Cognition (CERNEC), Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
8
1] Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. [2] Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract

We found that exposure of mice and rats to male but not female experimenters produces pain inhibition. Male-related stimuli induced a robust physiological stress response that results in stress-induced analgesia. This effect could be replicated with T-shirts worn by men, bedding material from gonadally intact and unfamiliar male mammals, and presentation of compounds secreted from the human axilla. Experimenter sex can thus affect apparent baseline responses in behavioral testing.

Comment in

PMID:
24776635
DOI:
10.1038/nmeth.2935
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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