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Nat Methods. 2014 Jun;11(6):670-6. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.2936. Epub 2014 Apr 28.

Chronic, wireless recordings of large-scale brain activity in freely moving rhesus monkeys.

Author information

1
1] Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. [2] Center for Neuroengineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
2
Monterey Spine, Monterey, California, USA.
3
1] Center for Neuroengineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. [2] Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
4
1] Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. [2] Center for Neuroengineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. [3] Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. [4] Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. [5] Edmond and Lily Safra International Institute of Neuroscience of Natal, Natal, Brazil.

Abstract

Advances in techniques for recording large-scale brain activity contribute to both the elucidation of neurophysiological principles and the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). Here we describe a neurophysiological paradigm for performing tethered and wireless large-scale recordings based on movable volumetric three-dimensional (3D) multielectrode implants. This approach allowed us to isolate up to 1,800 neurons (units) per animal and simultaneously record the extracellular activity of close to 500 cortical neurons, distributed across multiple cortical areas, in freely behaving rhesus monkeys. The method is expandable, in principle, to thousands of simultaneously recorded channels. It also allows increased recording longevity (5 consecutive years) and recording of a broad range of behaviors, such as social interactions, and BMI paradigms in freely moving primates. We propose that wireless large-scale recordings could have a profound impact on basic primate neurophysiology research while providing a framework for the development and testing of clinically relevant neuroprostheses.

PMID:
24776634
PMCID:
PMC4161037
DOI:
10.1038/nmeth.2936
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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