Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Biochem Sci. 2014 Jun;39(6):260-7. doi: 10.1016/j.tibs.2014.04.001. Epub 2014 Apr 26.

Prion-like aggregation of mutant p53 in cancer.

Author information

1
Instituto de Bioquímica Médica Leopoldo de Meis, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902, Brazil; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia (INCT) de Biologia Estrutural e Bioimagem, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902, Brazil. Electronic address: jerson@bioqmed.ufrj.br.
2
Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia (INCT) de Biologia Estrutural e Bioimagem, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902, Brazil; Departamento de Genética, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
3
Instituto de Bioquímica Médica Leopoldo de Meis, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902, Brazil; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia (INCT) de Biologia Estrutural e Bioimagem, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902, Brazil.
4
Instituto de Bioquímica Médica Leopoldo de Meis, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902, Brazil; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia (INCT) de Biologia Estrutural e Bioimagem, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902, Brazil; Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902, Brazil.

Abstract

p53 is a master regulatory protein that participates in cellular processes such as apoptosis, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. p53 functions as a homotetrameric tumor suppressor, and is lost in more than 50% of human cancers. Recent studies have suggested that the formation of mutant p53 aggregates is associated with loss-of-function (LoF), dominant-negative (DN), and gain-of-function (GoF) effects. We propose that these phenomena can be explained by a prion-like behavior of mutant p53. We discuss the shared properties of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases and how the prion-like properties of p53 aggregates offer potential targets for drug development.

KEYWORDS:

amyloid; cancer; p53; prion; prion-like proteins; protein aggregation

PMID:
24775734
DOI:
10.1016/j.tibs.2014.04.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center