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Nutr Res. 2014 Apr;34(4):294-301. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2014.01.007. Epub 2014 Feb 4.

Depressive symptoms are associated with dietary intake but not physical activity among overweight and obese women from disadvantaged neighborhoods.

Author information

1
Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.
2
Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC. Electronic address: sharpep@mailbox.sc.edu.
3
Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.
4
Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.

Abstract

Evidence suggests that depressive symptoms are associated with poorer dietary intake and inadequate physical activity; however, this association has not been examined in lower-income overweight and obese African American women. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the associations between depressive symptoms and diet and physical activity in 196 women (87% African American; age, 25-51 years). Higher depressive symptoms were hypothesized to predict poorer diet quality, greater emotional eating, lower physical activity levels, and greater sedentary time. Depressive symptoms were measured using the validated short form of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Dietary intake and quality were assessed using three 24-hour dietary recalls. Emotional eating was evaluated using 4 items from the emotional eating subscale of the Eating Behavior Patterns Questionnaire. Physical activity and sedentary time were objectively measured using the ActiGraph accelerometer. Linear regression models tested the associations between depressive symptoms and each dietary and physical activity outcome variable. Symptoms of depression were positively associated with total daily caloric intake from saturated fat and total sugars, as well as emotional eating scores (P < .05). Although not statistically significant, depressive symptoms were positively associated with sweetened beverage consumption (P = .06) and added sugars (P = .07). Depressive symptoms were not associated with total fat, sodium, fruit and vegetables, fast food consumption, the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, or sedentary time. Future studies should explore the mechanisms linking the identified associations between depressive symptoms and dietary intake, such as the role of emotional eating.

KEYWORDS:

African Americans; Depression; Diet; Physical activity; Women

PMID:
24774065
PMCID:
PMC4004962
DOI:
10.1016/j.nutres.2014.01.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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