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Meat Sci. 2014 Aug;97(4):583-96. doi: 10.1016/j.meatsci.2014.02.011. Epub 2014 Feb 24.

The role of red and processed meat in colorectal cancer development: a perspective.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, PO Box 5003, 1432 Aas, Norway. Electronic address: marije.oostindjer@nmbu.no.
2
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway.
3
Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, PO Box 5003, 1432 Aas, Norway; School of Life Science, Arizona State University, PO Box 874501, Tempe AZ 85287, USA.
4
Danish Agriculture & Food Council, Axelborg, Axeltorv 3, 1609 Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
Texas Therapeutics Institute, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 1825 Pressler Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
6
Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7489 Trondheim, Norway.
7
Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INRA, UMR1331 Toxalim, 23 Capelles, F-31076 Toulouse, France.
8
Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Department of Animal Production, Laboratory of Animal Nutrition and Animal Product Quality, Proefhoevestraat 10, 9090 Melle, Belgium.
9
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
10
Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, PO Box 5003, 1432 Aas, Norway.
11
Department of Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
12
RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
13
Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.
14
University of Wisconsin, Department of Animal Sciences, Meat Science & Muscle Biology Laboratory, 1805 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706, USA.
15
Western Human Nutrition Research Center, Davis, 430 West Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
16
Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, Division of Nutrition, PO Box 66, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
17
Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, PO Box 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo, Norway.
18
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 7082, 75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
19
Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, PO Box 5003, 1432 Aas, Norway.
20
DLW Consulting Services, LLC., 1302 N Oak Forest Rd., Salt Lake City, UT 84103, USA.

Abstract

This paper is based on a workshop held in Oslo, Norway in November 2013, in which experts discussed how to reach consensus on the healthiness of red and processed meat. Recent nutritional recommendations include reducing intake of red and processed meat to reduce cancer risk, in particular colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiological and mechanistic data on associations between red and processed meat intake and CRC are inconsistent and underlying mechanisms are unclear. There is a need for further studies on differences between white and red meat, between processed and whole red meat and between different types of processed meats, as potential health risks may not be the same for all products. Better biomarkers of meat intake and of cancer occurrence and updated food composition databases are required for future studies. Modifying meat composition via animal feeding and breeding, improving meat processing by alternative methods such as adding phytochemicals and improving our diets in general are strategies that need to be followed up.

KEYWORDS:

Animal models; Colorectal cancer; Epidemiology; Phytochemicals; Processed meat; Red meat

PMID:
24769880
DOI:
10.1016/j.meatsci.2014.02.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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