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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014 Aug;95(8):1441-6. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2014.04.002. Epub 2014 Apr 21.

Effect of interferential current stimulation in management of hemiplegic shoulder pain.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.
2
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. Electronic address: Sujitra.B@Chula.ac.th.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the immediate effects of interferential current stimulation (IFC) on shoulder pain and pain-free passive range of motion (PROM) of the shoulder in people with hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP).

DESIGN:

Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

SETTING:

Institutional physical therapy clinic, neurologic rehabilitation center.

PARTICIPANTS:

A population-based sample of people with HSP (N=30) was recruited.

INTERVENTION:

Participants were divided into 2 groups--an IFC group and a placebo group--by using a match-paired method (age, sex, and Brunnstrom motor recovery stage). In the IFC group, participants received IFC for 20 minutes with an amplitude-modulated frequency at 100 Hz in vector mode. The current intensity was increased until the participants felt a strong tingling sensation.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Pain intensity and pain-free PROM of the shoulder until the onset of pain were measured at baseline and immediately after treatment.

RESULTS:

Participants reported a greater reduction in pain during the most painful movement after treatment with IFC than with placebo (P<.05). The IFC group showed a greater improvement in posttreatment pain-free PROM than the placebo group in shoulder flexion (P<.01), abduction (P<.01), internal rotation (P<.01), and external rotation (P<.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides evidence that IFC is effective for the relief of pain during movement and also increases the pain-free PROM of the shoulder in people with HSP.

KEYWORDS:

Electrical stimulation; Interferential therapy; Rehabilitation; Shoulder pain; Stroke

PMID:
24769123
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2014.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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