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Appetite. 2014 Aug;79:158-65. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2014.04.011. Epub 2014 Apr 23.

Supplementing chicken broth with monosodium glutamate reduces energy intake from high fat and sweet snacks in middle-aged healthy women.

Author information

1
North American Research and Innovation Center, Ajinomoto North America, Inc., 400 Kelby Street, Fort Lee, NJ 07024, USA.
2
Torii Nutrient-Stasis Institute, Inc., 6F, Miyuki Bldg, 5-6-12 Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0061, Japan.
3
North American Research and Innovation Center, Ajinomoto North America, Inc., 400 Kelby Street, Fort Lee, NJ 07024, USA. Electronic address: eiichiro_kimura@ajinomoto.com.

Abstract

Monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) and inosine monophosphate-5 (IMP) are flavor enhancers for umami taste. However, their effects on appetite and food intake are not well-researched. The objective of the current study was to test their additions in a broth preload on subsequent appetite ratings, energy intake and food choice. Eighty-six healthy middle-aged women with normal body weight received three preload conditions on 3 test days 1 week apart - a low-energy chicken flavor broth (200 ml) as the control preload, and broths with added MSG alone (0.5 g/100 ml, MSG broth) or in combination with IMP (0.05 g/100 ml) (MSG+ broth) served as the experimental conditions. Fifteen minutes after preload administration subjects were provided an ad libitum testing meal which consisted of 16 snacks varying in taste and fat content. MSG and MSG+ enhanced savory taste and broth properties of liking and pleasantness. In comparison with control, the MSG preload resulted in less consumption of total energy, as well as energy from sweet and high-fat snacks. Furthermore, MSG broth preload reduced added sugar intake. These findings were not observed after MSG+ preload. Appetite ratings were not different across the three preloads. Results suggest a potential role of MSG addition to a low-energy broth preload in subsequent energy intake and food choice. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01761045.

KEYWORDS:

Appetite; Energy intake; Food choice; MSG; Satiety; Umami

PMID:
24768895
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2014.04.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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