Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Hepatol. 2014 Sep;61(3):626-32. doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2014.04.018. Epub 2014 Apr 24.

Weight trajectories through infancy and childhood and risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adolescence: the ALSPAC study.

Author information

1
MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. Electronic address: emma.louise.anderson@bristol.ac.uk.
2
MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
3
University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, UK.
4
Institute of Cardiovascular & Medical Sciences, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Glasgow, UK.
5
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, UK.
6
MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Adiposity is a key risk factor for NAFLD. Few studies have examined prospective associations of infant and childhood adiposity with subsequent NAFLD risk. We examined associations of weight-for-height trajectories from birth to age 10 with liver outcomes in adolescence, and assessed the extent to which associations are mediated through fat mass at the time of outcome assessment.

METHODS:

Individual trajectories of weight and height were estimated for participants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children using random-effects linear-spline models. Associations of birthweight (adjusted for birth length) and weight change (adjusted for length/height change) from 0-3 months, 3 months-1 y, 1-3 y, 3-7 y, and 7-10 y with ultrasound scan (USS) determined liver fat and stiffness, and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) at mean age 17.8 y were assessed with linear and logistic regressions. Mediation by concurrent fat mass was assessed with adjustment for fat mass at mean age 17.8 y.

RESULTS:

Birth weight was positively associated with liver stiffness and negatively with ALT and AST. Weight change from birth to 1 y was not associated with outcomes. Weight change from 1-3 y, 3-7 y, and 7-10 y was consistently positively associated with USS and blood-based liver outcomes. Adjusting for fat mass at mean age 17.8 y attenuated associations toward the null, suggesting associations are largely mediated by concurrent body fatness.

CONCLUSIONS:

Greater rates of weight-for-height change between 1 y and 10 y are consistently associated with adverse liver outcomes in adolescence. These associations are largely mediated through concurrent fatness.

KEYWORDS:

BMI; Childhood; Fatty liver; Growth; Infant; NAFLD; Obesity

PMID:
24768828
PMCID:
PMC4139262
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhep.2014.04.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center