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Spine J. 2014 Dec 1;14(12):2897-904. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2014.04.018. Epub 2014 Apr 24.

Percutaneous dorsal instrumentation for thoracolumbar extension-distraction fractures in patients with ankylosing spinal disorders: a case series.

Author information

1
Department of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Giessen and Marburg, Baldingerstraße, 35043 Marburg, Germany.
2
Department of Orthopaedics and Rheumatology, University of Giessen and Marburg, Baldingerstraße, 35043 Marburg, Germany.
3
Department of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Giessen and Marburg, Baldingerstraße, 35043 Marburg, Germany. Electronic address: lechler@med.uni-marburg.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND CONTEXT:

Thoracolumbar extension-distraction fractures are rare injuries mainly restricted to patients suffering from ankylosing spinal disorders. The most appropriate surgical treatment of these unstable spinal injuries remains to be clarified.

PURPOSE:

To report on a cohort of 10 patients treated with closed reduction and percutaneous dorsal instrumentation.

STUDY DESIGN:

Case series.

PATIENT SAMPLE:

Ten consecutive patients with ankylosing spinal disorders and thoracolumbar extension-distraction fractures (Type B3 according to the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System).

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Postoperative reduction, alignment, and implant position were analyzed by computed tomography. Loss of reduction was assessed on lateral radiographs by using the Cobb technique. Ambulation ability and pain were assessed at follow-up.

METHODS:

Minimally invasive dorsal percutaneous instrumentation was performed in 10 consecutive patients (3 men, 7 women) with a mean age of 81.5 (range 72-90) years between May 2010 and December 2012. The mean postoperative follow-up time was 7.9 (range 4-28) months.

RESULTS:

All 10 patients were treated with closed reduction and dorsal instrumentation; in no case was conversion to an open approach required. The mean operation time was 60.2 (range 32-135) minutes. None of the patients presented neurologic deficits. Cement-augmented screws were implanted in two cases. Sufficient radiographic correction was achieved in all patients; no case of loss of reduction was noted at final follow-up. In one case, complete hardware removal was performed 9 months after the index operation because of persistent back pain at the level of the implant. One patient died of postoperative inferior vena cava obstruction. At discharge, all patients were able to ambulate without the need for crutches or opioid analgesics. At final follow-up, all patients ambulated with full weight bearing; four patients reported persistent back pain.

CONCLUSIONS:

In fragile patients with ankylosing spinal disorders and thoracolumbar extension-distraction fractures, closed reduction and percutaneous dorsal instrumentation provide a satisfying midterm functional outcome while minimizing perioperative risks compared with conventional dorsoventral procedures.

KEYWORDS:

Ankylosing disorders; Ankylosing spondylitis; Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis; Dorsal instrumentation; Percutaneus spinal surgery; Spinal fracture

PMID:
24768733
DOI:
10.1016/j.spinee.2014.04.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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