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Trends Cogn Sci. 2014 Jul;18(7):376-84. doi: 10.1016/j.tics.2014.03.004. Epub 2014 Apr 24.

Stimulus-response bindings in priming.

Author information

1
MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK. Electronic address: rik.henson@mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk.
2
Institut für Psychologie, Universität Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Center for Cognition, Learning, and Memory, Universität Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
3
Institut Neurosciences Cognition, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France; CNRS Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception UMR 8242, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France.
4
Allgemeine Psychologie und Methodenlehre, Universtät Trier, Trier, Germany.
5
Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK; Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK.

Abstract

People can rapidly form arbitrary associations between stimuli and the responses they make in the presence of those stimuli. Such stimulus-response (S-R) bindings, when retrieved, affect the way that people respond to the same, or related, stimuli. Only recently, however, has the flexibility and ubiquity of these S-R bindings been appreciated, particularly in the context of priming paradigms. This is important for the many cognitive theories that appeal to evidence from priming. It is also important for the control of action generally. An S-R binding is more than a gradually learned association between a specific stimulus and a specific response; instead, it captures the full, context-dependent behavioral potential of a stimulus.

KEYWORDS:

S–R bindings; automaticity; masked priming; negative priming; repetition suppression; subliminal priming

PMID:
24768034
PMCID:
PMC4074350
DOI:
10.1016/j.tics.2014.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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