Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Transplant Proc. 2014 Apr;46(3):774-7. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2013.10.053.

Long-term survival analysis of liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma with bile duct tumor thrombus.

Author information

1
Division of Hepatobiliary Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Division of Hepatobiliary Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: shwang@amc.seoul.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Long-term prognosis of liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with macroscopic bile duct tumor thrombus (BDTT) has not been well assessed. This study intended to analyze the post-transplantation outcomes in patients who had HCC with macroscopic BDTT.

METHODS:

A retrospective study was performed with 14 patients who underwent LT for HCC with BDTT (0.7%) after selection from an institutional database of 2052 adult LT cases.

RESULTS:

Types of LT were living donor LT in 13 and deceased donor LT in 1. The extents of BDTT were Ueda type 1 in 4, type 2 in 3, and type 3 in 7. Milan criteria were met in 8 (57.1%). Concurrent bile duct resection was performed in 7 (50%). Mean model for end-stage liver disease score was 18.7 ± 4.9. Mean graft-recipient weight ratio was 1.2 ± 0.3. There was one case of perioperative mortality and one case of HCC-unrelated late mortality. Cumulative HCC recurrence rates were 15.4% at 1 year, 46.2% at 3 years, and 46.2% at 5 years. Overall patient survival rates were 92.9% at 1 year, 57.1% at 3 years, and 50% at 5 years. Univariate risk factor analyses revealed that only macrovascular invasion was a significant risk factor for HCC recurrence (P = .019).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study revealed that LT for HCC with macroscopic BDTT has a high risk of post-transplantation HCC recurrence; therefore, further large-volume studies are necessary to elucidate the risk factors.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center