Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Affect Disord. 2014 Jun;162:61-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2014.03.015. Epub 2014 Mar 24.

The effect of comorbid major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder on cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; Anxiety Treatment and Research Centre, St. Joseph׳s Healthcare Hamilton, ON, Canada. Electronic address: rmccabe@stjosham.on.ca.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Women׳s College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) commonly co-occur in individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD), yet whether these comorbidities influence the outcomes of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for SAD is unclear.

METHODS:

The present study examined the degree to which individuals with SAD and comorbid MDD (SAD+MDD; n=76), comorbid BD (SAD+BD; n=19), a comorbid anxiety disorder (SAD+ANX; n=27), or no comorbid diagnoses (SAD+NCO; n=41) benefitted from CBT for SAD. Individuals were screened using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and then completed the Social Phobia Inventory and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales before and after 12-weeks of group CBT for SAD.

RESULTS:

At pretreatment the SAD+MDD and SAD+BD groups reported higher social anxiety symptoms than the SAD+ANX and SAD+NCO groups. All groups reported large and significant improvement in social anxiety with CBT. However, at posttreatment the SAD+MDD and SAD+BD groups continued to have higher social anxiety symptoms than the SAD+NCO group, and the SAD+ANX group did not differ in social anxiety symptoms from any group. The sample also showed small and statistically significant improvement in depressive symptoms with CBT for SAD.

LIMITATIONS:

Information about medication was not collected in the present study, and we did not assess the long-term effects of CBT.

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that CBT for SAD is an effective treatment even in the presence of comorbid mood disorders in the short-term, although extending the course of treatment may be helpful for this population and should be investigated in future research.

KEYWORDS:

Bipolar disorder; Cognitive behavioral therapy; Comorbidity; Major depressive disorder; Social anxiety disorder

PMID:
24767007
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2014.03.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center