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Appl Ergon. 2014 Nov;45(6):1399-405. doi: 10.1016/j.apergo.2014.03.008. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

The assessment of material handling strategies in dealing with sudden loading: the effects of load handling position on trunk biomechanics.

Author information

1
Department of Industrial and Management Systems Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA. Electronic address: xiaopeng.ning@mail.wvu.edu.
2
Department of Industrial and Management Systems Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA. Electronic address: jizhou@mix.wvu.edu.
3
Division of Kinesiology and Health, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA. Electronic address: bdai@uwyo.edu.
4
Department of Industrial and Management Systems Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA. Electronic address: majid.jaridi@mail.wvu.edu.

Abstract

Back injury caused by sudden loading is a significant risk among workers that perform manual handling tasks. The present study investigated the effects of load handling position on trunk biomechanics (flexion angle, L5/S1 joint moment and compression force) during sudden loading. Eleven subjects were exposed to a 6.8 kg sudden loading while standing upright, facing forward and holding load at three different vertical heights in the sagittal plane or 45° left to the sagittal plane (created by arm rotation). Results showed that the increase of load holding height significantly elevated the peak L5/S1 joint compression force and reduced the magnitude of trunk flexion. Further, experiencing sudden loading from an asymmetric direction resulted in significantly smaller peak L5/S1 joint compression force, trunk flexion angle and L5/S1 joint moment than a symmetric posture. These findings suggest that handling loads in a lower position could work as a protective strategy during sudden loading.

KEYWORDS:

Back injury; Load handling position; Sudden loading

PMID:
24766903
DOI:
10.1016/j.apergo.2014.03.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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