Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Neurosci. 2014 May;17(5):647-51. doi: 10.1038/nn.3693. Epub 2014 Apr 25.

More than a rhythm of life: breathing as a binder of orofacial sensation.

Author information

1
1] Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. [2] Section of Neurobiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, Centre de Recherche Université Laval Robert-Giffard, Québec City, Québec, Canada.
3
Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
4
Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.

Abstract

When rodents engage in the exploration of novel stimuli, breathing occurs at an accelerated rate that is synchronous with whisking. We review the recently observed relationships between breathing and the sensations of smell and vibrissa-based touch. We consider the hypothesis that the breathing rhythm serves not only as a motor drive signal, but also as a common clock that binds these two senses into a common percept. This possibility may be extended to include taste through the coordination of licking with breathing. Here we evaluate the status of experimental evidence that pertains to this hypothesis.

PMID:
24762718
PMCID:
PMC4140942
DOI:
10.1038/nn.3693
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center