Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2014 Aug;27:158-64. doi: 10.1016/j.conb.2014.03.001. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

Shared mechanisms between Drosophila peripheral nervous system development and human neurodegenerative diseases.

Author information

1
Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, BCM, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
2
Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, BCM, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
3
Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, BCM, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Neuroscience, BCM, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: hbellen@bcm.edu.

Abstract

Signaling pathways and cellular processes that regulate neural development are used post-developmentally for proper function and maintenance of the nervous system. Genes that have been studied in the context of the development of Drosophila peripheral nervous system (PNS) and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) have been identified as players in the pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases, including spinocerebellar ataxia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. Hence, by unraveling the molecular mechanisms that underlie proneural induction, cell fate determination, axonal targeting, dendritic branching, and synapse formation in Drosophila, novel features related to these disorders have been revealed. In this review, we summarize and discuss how studies of Drosophila PNS and NMJ development have provided guidance in experimental approaches for these diseases.

PMID:
24762652
PMCID:
PMC4122633
DOI:
10.1016/j.conb.2014.03.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center