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Curr Opin Immunol. 2014 Aug;29:23-8. doi: 10.1016/j.coi.2014.03.007. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

Inflammation, ageing and chronic disease.

Author information

1
Tübingen Ageing and Tumour Immunology Group, Second Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Medical Research, ZMF, Waldhörnlerstr. 22, D-72072 Tübingen, Germany. Electronic address: graham.pawelec@uni-tuebingen.de.
2
Tübingen Ageing and Tumour Immunology Group, Second Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Medical Research, ZMF, Waldhörnlerstr. 22, D-72072 Tübingen, Germany.

Abstract

Acute inflammatory responses are essential for pathogen control and tissue repair but can also cause severe collateral damage. Tight regulation of the response is required to minimize host injury, but in the face of chronic infections and age-associated immune dysregulation, inflammatory processes may exert multiple detrimental effects on the organism. The signs of low level systemic inflammation commonly detectable in elderly people are associated with many chronic diseases of ageing and may even contribute to their causation. The purpose of this article is to review recent literature from the past two years providing new data on the inter-relationships between inflammatory status and chronic diseases of ageing.

PMID:
24762450
DOI:
10.1016/j.coi.2014.03.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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