Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Med Acupunct. 2013 Feb;25(1):43-47.

Adherence to, and Satisfaction with, the Self-Acupressure Intervention in the LIFE Weight-Loss Maintenance Study.

Author information

1
Science Programs Department, Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research , Portland, OR.
2
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona , Tucson, AZ.
3
Healing Touch Acupuncture , Portland, OR.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The LIFE study was a randomized controlled trial assessing the impact of a self-acupressure intervention, Tapas Acupressure Technique® (TAT®), on weight-loss maintenance. The primary analysis showed no significant difference between TAT and social support (SS) for weight-loss maintenance, while exploratory post hoc tests suggested that, among participants with highest initial weight-loss, those in the TAT condition regained less weight than those in the SS condition.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the current study was to assess adherence to, and satisfaction with, the experimental self-acupressure intervention in the LIFE weight loss maintenance trial.

DESIGN:

This was a secondary analysis of adherence and satisfaction patterns in a large randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

The study was conducted at a prominent health maintenance organization in the Pacific Northwest.

SUBJECTS:

This study involved 142 obese participants who had lost >10 pounds in a conventional weight-loss program and who were randomized to the experimental acupressure intervention.

INTERVENTIONS:

The experimental intervention (n=142) arm consisted of instruction and application of a self-acupressure intervention, the Tapas Acupressure Technique® (TAT®).

OUTCOME MEASURES:

The outcome sought was self-reported satisfaction and frequency of TAT practice.

RESULTS:

Sixty-six percent of TAT participants attended at least 6 of 8 intervention sessions. More than 80% of participants reported practicing TAT at home, on average, at least 2 days per week. Sixty two percent reported practicing <10 minutes per session, while 27% reported practicing 10-20 minutes per session. Higher satisfaction scores were significantly correlated with less weight regain (p=0.001). Frequency of TAT practice was not significantly associated with changes in weight, stress, insomnia, depression, or quality of life.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest moderate acceptance of, and adherence to, the TAT intervention. Further research is required to identify and achieve optimal home-practice levels of self-acupressure techniques.

KEYWORDS:

Acupressure; Energy Psychology; Tapas Acupressure Technique; Weight Loss Maintenance

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center