Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes. 2014 Oct;63(10):3523-9. doi: 10.2337/db14-0122. Epub 2014 Apr 23.

Cerebral microvascular lesions on high-resolution 7-Tesla MRI in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands m.brundel-2@umcutrecht.nl.
2
Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
3
Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
4
Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Abstract

Cerebral small vessel disease, including microvascular lesions, is considered to play an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)-associated cognitive deficits. With ultra-high field MRI, microvascular lesions (e.g., microinfarcts and microbleeds) can now be visualized in vivo. For the current study, 48 nondemented older individuals with T2DM (mean age 70.3 ± 4.1 years) and 49 age-, sex-, and education-matched control subjects underwent a 7-Tesla brain MRI scan and a detailed cognitive assessment. The occurrence of cortical microinfarcts and cerebral microbleeds was assessed on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and T1-weighted and T2*-weighted images, respectively, compared between the groups, and related to cognitive performance. Microinfarcts were found in 38% of control subjects and 48% of patients with T2DM. Microbleeds were present in 41% of control subjects and 33% of patients (all P > 0.05). The presence and number of microinfarcts or microbleeds were unrelated to cognitive performance. This study showed that microvascular brain lesions on ultra-high field MRI are not significantly more common in well-controlled patients with T2DM than in control subjects.

PMID:
24760137
DOI:
10.2337/db14-0122
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center