Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2014 Apr 23;9(4):e95791. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0095791. eCollection 2014.

Allostatic load model associated with indoor environmental quality and sick building syndrome among office workers.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan city, Taiwan.
2
Department of Chemistry, College of Science and Engineering, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei city, Taiwan.

Abstract

This study investigates whether indoor environmental quality (IEQ) influences allostatic load (AL) and whether AL can be a predictor for sick building syndrome (SBS). We also assessed and compared the associations between AL and SBS versus 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and SBS. A total of 115 office workers from 21 offices completed self-reported SBS questionnaires, and provided 11 biomarkers for their AL. Multiple linear regressions and logistic regression analysis were applied to examine the correlations between IEQ and AL or 8-OHdG and between AL or 8-OHdG and SBS, respectively. Our data revealed that the neuroendocrine system was correlated with CO2, the difference between indoor and outdoor CO2 levels (dCO2), and the indoor-outdoor ratio of CO2 (CO2 I/O). Metabolic system effects were associated with illumination. The relationships between illumination, CO2, dCO2, CO2 I/O and 8-OHdG were consistent with those and AL in specific systems. Furthermore, we found that risks for SBS syndromes were related with neuroendocrine and metabolic system of the AL. 8-OHdG was associated with eye dryness or irritation, eye tiredness and vomiting. We conclude that IEQ significantly influences AL and that AL can be a predictor for reporting SBS with information on system-specific effects.

PMID:
24759685
PMCID:
PMC3997416
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0095791
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center