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Sci Rep. 2014 Apr 24;4:4768. doi: 10.1038/srep04768.

Prevalence and correlates of vitamin K deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

Author information

1
Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases, Poznan, Poland.
2
Medical University of Silesia, Department of Paediatrics, Katowice, Poland.
3
Medical University of Gdansk, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Gdansk, Poland.
4
Nicolaus Copernicus University, Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Department of Pediatric Endoscopy and Gastrointestinal Function Testing, Bydgoszcz, Poland.
5
Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland.
6
Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of General, Gastroenterological and Endocrinological Surgery, Poznan, Poland.
7
Institute of Human Genetics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznan, Poland.

Abstract

Although vitamin K deficiency has been implicated in adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), its prevalence in pediatric IBD remains unknown. We carried out a cross-sectional study in 63 children with Crohn's disease (CD) and 48 with ulcerative colitis (UC) to assess the prevalence of vitamin K deficiency and to search for potential correlation between vitamin K status and pediatric IBD activity. Vitamin K status was assessed using protein induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II; ELISA). Prevalence of vitamin K deficiency was 54.0% in CD and 43.7% in UC. Vitamin K deficiency was more common in patients with higher CD activity, in CD patients with higher mass Z-scores, and less common among children with CD treated with infliximab. Relation of vitamin K deficiency to pediatric IBD clinical course and treatment demand further research.

PMID:
24759680
PMCID:
PMC3998013
DOI:
10.1038/srep04768
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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