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Nat Commun. 2014 Apr 23;5:3706. doi: 10.1038/ncomms4706.

The emerging biofuel crop Camelina sativa retains a highly undifferentiated hexaploid genome structure.

Author information

1
1] Saskatoon Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 107 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 0X2 [2] National Research Council Canada, 110 Gymnasium Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 0W9.
2
National Research Council Canada, 110 Gymnasium Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 0W9.
3
Saskatoon Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 107 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 0X2.
4
Plant and AgriBiosciences Centre (PABC), School of Natural Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.

Abstract

Camelina sativa is an oilseed with desirable agronomic and oil-quality attributes for a viable industrial oil platform crop. Here we generate the first chromosome-scale high-quality reference genome sequence for C. sativa and annotated 89,418 protein-coding genes, representing a whole-genome triplication event relative to the crucifer model Arabidopsis thaliana. C. sativa represents the first crop species to be sequenced from lineage I of the Brassicaceae. The well-preserved hexaploid genome structure of C. sativa surprisingly mirrors those of economically important amphidiploid Brassica crop species from lineage II as well as wheat and cotton. The three genomes of C. sativa show no evidence of fractionation bias and limited expression-level bias, both characteristics commonly associated with polyploid evolution. The highly undifferentiated polyploid genome of C. sativa presents significant consequences for breeding and genetic manipulation of this industrial oil crop.

PMID:
24759634
PMCID:
PMC4015329
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms4706
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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