Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Med Clin North Am. 2014 May;98(3):405-28. doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2014.01.003. Epub 2014 Mar 22.

Low back pain.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Box 356420, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195-6420, USA; VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, General Medicine Service, S-123-PCC, 1660 South Columbian Way, Seattle, WA 98108, USA. Electronic address: zilanna@uw.edu.
2
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Box 356420, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195-6420, USA; VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, General Medicine Service, S-123-PCC, 1660 South Columbian Way, Seattle, WA 98108, USA.

Abstract

Low back pain is a common, frequently recurring condition that often has a nonspecific cause. Most nonspecific acute low back pain will improve within several weeks with or without treatment. The diagnostic workup should focus on evaluation for evidence of systemic or pathologic causes. Psychosocial distress, poor coping skills, and high initial disability increase the risk for a prolonged disability course. All patients with acute or chronic low back pain should be advised to remain active. The treatment of chronic nonspecific low back pain involves a multidisciplinary approach targeted at preserving function and preventing disability. Surgical referral is indicated in the presence of severe or progressive neurologic deficits or signs and symptoms of cauda equina syndrome.

KEYWORDS:

Acute low back pain; Cause; Chronic low back pain; Diagnosis; Imaging; Risk factors; Sciatica; Treatment

PMID:
24758954
DOI:
10.1016/j.mcna.2014.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center