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Rofo. 2014 Jun;186(6):585-90. doi: 10.1055/s-0034-1366426. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

High-pitch computed tomography of the lung in pediatric patients: an intraindividual comparison of image quality and radiation dose to conventional 64-MDCT.

Author information

1
Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen.
2
Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital of Tuebingen.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of typical artifacts in low-dose pediatric lung examinations using high-pitch computed tomography (HPCT) compared to MDCT, and to estimate the effective radiation dose (Eeff).

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Institutional review board approval for this retrospective study was obtained. 35 patients (17 boys, 18 girls; mean age 112 ± 69 months) were included and underwent MDCT and follow-up scan by HPCT or vice versa (mean follow-up time 87 days), using the same tube voltage and current. The total artifact score (0 - 8) was defined as the sum of artifacts arising from movement, breathing or pulsation of the heart or pulmonary vessels (0 - no; 1 - moderate; 2 - severe artifacts). Eeff was estimated according to the European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Multislice Computed Tomography. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze differences between the patient groups. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used for correlation of ordinal variables.

RESULTS:

The scan time was significantly lower for HPCT compared to MDCT (0.72 ± 0.13 s vs. 3.65 ± 0.81s; p < 0.0001). In 28 of 35 (80 %) HPCT examinations no artifacts were visible, whereas in MDCT artifacts occurred in all examinations. The frequency of pulsation artifacts and breathing artifacts was higher in MDCT compared to HPCT (100 % vs. 17 % and 31 % vs. 6 %). The total artifact score significantly correlated with the patient's age in MDCT (r = - 0.42; p = 0.01), but not in HPCT (r = - 0.32; p = 0.07). The estimated Eeff was significantly lower in HPCT than in MDCT (1.29 ± 0.31 vs. 1.47 ± 0.37 mSv; p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

Our study indicates that the use of HPCT has advantages for pediatric lung imaging with a reduction of breathing and pulsation artifacts. Moreover, the estimated Eeff was lower. In addition, examinations can be performed without sedation or breath-hold without losing image quality.

KEY POINTS:

• Fewer artifacts in pediatric lung imaging with HPCT• Reduced Eeff in HPCT• HPCT without sedation or breath-hold without loss of image quality.

PMID:
24756428
DOI:
10.1055/s-0034-1366426
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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