Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Esthet Restor Dent. 2014 Nov-Dec;26(6):382-93. doi: 10.1111/jerd.12100. Epub 2014 Apr 23.

Resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials: a review of the literature.

Author information

1
Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg, Germany.

Abstract

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM:

Resin bonding is essential for clinical longevity of indirect restorations. Especially in light of the increasing popularity of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-fabricated indirect restorations, there is a need to assess optimal bonding protocols for new ceramic/polymer materials and indirect composites.

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY:

The aim of this article was to review and assess the current scientific evidence on the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

An electronic PubMed database search was conducted from 1966 to September 2013 for in vitro studies pertaining the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials.

RESULTS:

The search revealed 198 titles. Full-text screening was carried out for 43 studies, yielding 18 relevant articles that complied with inclusion criteria. No relevant studies could be identified regarding new ceramic/polymer materials. Most common surface treatments are aluminum-oxide air-abrasion, silane treatment, and hydrofluoric acid-etching for indirect composite restoration. Self-adhesive cements achieve lower bond strengths in comparison with etch-and-rinse systems. Thermocycling has a greater impact on bonding behavior than water storage.

CONCLUSIONS:

Air-particle abrasion and additional silane treatment should be applied to enhance the resin bond to laboratory-processed composites. However, there is an urgent need for in vitro studies that evaluate the bond strength to new ceramic/polymer materials.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE:

This article reviews the available dental literature on resin bond of laboratory composites and gives scientifically based guidance for their successful placement. Furthermore, this review demonstrated that future research for new ceramic/polymer materials is required.

PMID:
24754327
DOI:
10.1111/jerd.12100
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center