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J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2014 Oct;23(10):1449-53. doi: 10.1016/j.jse.2014.01.052. Epub 2014 Apr 18.

Perioperative complications after hemiarthroplasty and total shoulder arthroplasty are equivalent.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
2
Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA. Electronic address: Ilya_Voloshin@urmc.rochester.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) results in superior clinical outcomes to hemiarthroplasty (HA); however, TSA is a more technical and invasive procedure. This study retrospectively compares perioperative complications after HA and TSA using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database.

METHODS:

The NSQIP user file was queried for HA and TSA cases from the years 2005 through 2010. Major complications were defined as life-threatening or debilitating. All complications occurred within 30 days of the initial procedure. We performed multivariate analysis to compare complication rates between the two procedures, controlling for patient comorbidities.

RESULTS:

The database returned 1,718 patients (HA in 30.4% [n = 523] and TSA in 69.6% [n = 1,195]). The major complication rates in the HA group (5.2%, n = 29) and TSA group (5.1%, n = 61) were similar (P = .706). Rates of blood transfusions for postoperative bleeding in patients undergoing HA (2.3%, n = 12) and TSA (2.9%, n = 35) were indistinguishable (P = .458). Venous thromboembolism was a rare complication, occurring in 0.4% of patients in each group (2 HA patients and 5 TSA patients, P > .999). On multivariate analysis, the operative procedure was not associated with major complications (P = .349); however, emergency case, pulmonary comorbidity, anemia with a hematocrit level lower than 36%, and wound class of III or IV increased the risk of a major complication (P < .05 for all).

CONCLUSION:

Multivariate analysis of patients undergoing TSA or HA in the NSQIP database suggests that patient factors-not the procedure being performed-are significant predictors of major complications. Controlling for patient comorbidities, we found no increased risk of perioperative major complications in patients undergoing TSA compared with HA.

KEYWORDS:

Perioperative; complications; hemiarthroplasty; total shoulder arthroplasty

PMID:
24751531
DOI:
10.1016/j.jse.2014.01.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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