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J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2014 Oct;23(10):1468-72. doi: 10.1016/j.jse.2014.01.045. Epub 2014 Apr 18.

Assessment of rotator cuff repair integrity using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in a multicenter study.

Author information

1
The Everett Clinic, Everett, WA, USA. Electronic address: mikecodsi@gmail.com.
2
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA.
3
The CORE Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
4
inVentiv Health Clinical, contracted to Pfizer Inc, Cambridge, MA, USA.
5
University of California San Francisco, Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study compared ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of the repaired rotator cuff to determine concordance between these imaging studies.

METHODS:

We performed a concordance study using the data from a prospective nonrandomized multicenter study at 13 centers. A suture bridge technique was used to repair 113 rotator cuff tears that were between 1 and 4 cm wide. Repairs were evaluated with MRI and ultrasound at multiple time points after surgery. The MRI scans were read by a central radiologist and the surgeon, and the ultrasounds were read by a local radiologist or the surgeon who performed the ultrasound.

RESULTS:

The concordance between the central radiologist's MRI reading and the investigator's MRI readings at all time points was 89%, with a κ coefficient of 0.60. The concordance between the central radiologist's MRI and ultrasound readings at all time points was 85%, with a κ coefficient of 0.40. The concordance between the investigator's MRI and ultrasound readings was 92%, with a κ coefficient of 0.70.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the community setting, ultrasound may be used to evaluate the integrity of a repaired rotator cuff tendon and constitutes a comparable alternative to MRI when evaluating the integrity of a rotator cuff repair. Clinical investigators should compare their postoperative ultrasound results with their postoperative MRI results for a certain time period to establish the accuracy of ultrasound before relying solely on ultrasound imaging to evaluate the integrity of their rotator cuff repairs.

KEYWORDS:

MRI; Rotator cuff repair; arthroscopy; surgery; ultrasound

PMID:
24751529
DOI:
10.1016/j.jse.2014.01.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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