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Adv Virus Res. 2014;89:141-99. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-800172-1.00004-5.

Circulative, "nonpropagative" virus transmission: an orchestra of virus-, insect-, and plant-derived instruments.

Author information

1
Biological Integrated Pest Management Research Unit, USDA, ARS, Ithaca, New York, USA; Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. Electronic address: smg3@cornell.edu.
2
Biological Integrated Pest Management Research Unit, USDA, ARS, Ithaca, New York, USA; Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA; Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Ithaca, New York, USA.
3
Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel.

Abstract

Species of plant viruses within the Luteoviridae, Geminiviridae, and Nanoviridae are transmitted by phloem-feeding insects in a circulative, nonpropagative manner. The precise route of virus movement through the vector can differ across and within virus families, but these viruses all share many biological, biochemical, and ecological features. All share temporal and spatial constraints with respect to transmission efficiency. The viruses also induce physiological changes in their plant hosts resulting in behavioral changes in the insects that optimize the transmission of virus to new hosts. Virus proteins interact with insect, endosymbiont, and plant proteins to orchestrate, directly and indirectly, virus movement in insects and plants to facilitate transmission. Knowledge of these complex interactions allows for the development of new tools to reduce or prevent transmission, to quickly identify important vector populations, and to improve the management of these economically important viruses affecting agricultural and natural plant populations.

KEYWORDS:

Aphid; Begomovirus; Endosymbiont; Geminivirus; Genetic heterogeneity; Luteovirus; Nanovirus; Polerovirus; Protein Interaction Reporter; Protein topology; Vector behavior; Vector biology; Vector competence; Vector manipulation hypothesis; Virus transmission; Whitefly

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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