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Diabet Med. 2014 Oct;31(10):1230-6. doi: 10.1111/dme.12470. Epub 2014 Apr 30.

Racial disparities in cardiovascular risk factor control in an underinsured population with Type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate the race-specific trend in attainment of the American Diabetes Association cardiovascular risk factor control goals (HbA1c <53 mmol/mol (7.0%), blood pressure <130/80 mmHg and LDL cholesterol <2.6mmol/l) by patients with Type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

The study sample included 14 946 African-American and 12 758 white patients who were newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes between 2001 and 2009 in the Louisiana State University Hospital system. The race-specific percentages of patients' attainment of American Diabetes Association goals were calculated using the baseline and follow-up measurements of HbA1c , blood pressure, and LDL cholesterol levels. Logistic regression was used to test the difference between African-American and white patients.

RESULTS:

The percentage of patients who met all three American Diabetes Association goals increased from 8.2% in 2001 to 10.2% in 2009 (increased by 24.4%) in this cohort. Compared with African-American patients, white patients had better attainment of the following American Diabetes Association goals: HbA1c (61.4 vs. 55.1%), blood pressure (25.8 vs. 20.4%), LDL cholesterol (40.1 vs. 37.7%) and all three goals (7.3 vs. 5.1%). African-American and white patients generally had a better cardiovascular disease risk factor profile during follow-up when we assessed attainment of the American Diabetes Association goals by means of HbA1c , blood pressure and LDL cholesterol.

CONCLUSIONS:

During 2001-2009, the present low-income cohort of people with Type 2 diabetes generally experienced improved control of cardiovascular disease risk factors. White patients had better attainment of the American Diabetes Association cardiovascular risk factor control goals than their African-American counterparts.

PMID:
24750373
PMCID:
PMC4167915
DOI:
10.1111/dme.12470
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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