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Indian J Public Health. 2014 Jan-Mar;58(1):22-6. doi: 10.4103/0019-557X.128160.

Effect of very early skin to skin contact on success at breastfeeding and preventing early hypothermia in neonates.

Author information

1
Clinical Assistant, Department of Pediatrics, Fortis Escorts Hospital and Research Centre, Faridabad, Haryana, India.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Birth and immediate postpartum period pose many challenges for the newborn. The neonatal mortality rates are high in India, whereas the breastfeeding rates are still low. Hence, need exists for a simple and easily applicable intervention, which may counter these challenges.

AIMS:

The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of very early skin-to-skin contact (SSC), in term babies with their mothers, on success of breastfeeding and neonatal well-being.

SETTINGS AND DESIGN:

Randomized control trial conducted over 2 years' period in a tertiary care hospital.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Healthy babies delivered normally were included. Very early SSC between mothers and their newborns was initiated in the study group. We studied effective suckling (using modified infant breastfeeding assessment tool [IBFAT]), breastfeeding status at 6 weeks, maternal satisfaction, thermal regulation, baby's weight and morbidity.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS:

T-test, Pearson Chi-square test and non-parametric Mann-Whitney test were used through relevant Windows SPSS software version 16.0.

RESULTS:

We observed that SSC contributed to better suckling competence as measured by IBFAT score (P < 0.0001). More babies in the SSC group were exclusively breastfed at first follow-up visit (P = 0.002) and at 6 weeks (P < 0.0001). SSC led to higher maternal satisfaction rates, better temperature gain in immediate post-partum period, lesser weight loss was at discharge and at first follow-up (all P < 0.0001) and lesser morbidity than the study group (P = 0.006).

CONCLUSION:

Very early SSC is an effective intervention that improves baby's suckling competence, maternal satisfaction, breastfeeding rates and temperature control and weight patterns.

PMID:
24748353
DOI:
10.4103/0019-557X.128160
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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