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Appl Environ Microbiol. 2014 Jul;80(13):3842-9. doi: 10.1128/AEM.00835-14. Epub 2014 Apr 18.

In situ evaluation of Paenibacillus alvei in reducing carriage of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport on whole tomato plants.

Author information

1
Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, College Park, Maryland, USA Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA.
2
Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, College Park, Maryland, USA.
3
Environmental Microbial and Food Safety Laboratory, Agriculture Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, Maryland, USA.
4
Virginia Tech, Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Painter, Virginia, USA.
5
Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, College Park, Maryland, USA jie.zheng@fda.hhs.gov.

Abstract

Recently, tomatoes have been implicated as a primary vehicle in food-borne outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport and other Salmonella serovars. Long-term intervention measures to reduce Salmonella prevalence on tomatoes remain elusive for growing and postharvest environments. A naturally occurring bacterium identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Paenibacillus alvei was isolated epiphytically from plants native to the Virginia Eastern Shore tomato-growing region. After initial antimicrobial activity screening against Salmonella and 10 other bacterial pathogens associated with the human food supply, strain TS-15 was further used to challenge an attenuated strain of S. Newport on inoculated fruits, leaves, and blossoms of tomato plants in an insect-screened high tunnel with a split-plot design. Survival of Salmonella after inoculation was measured for groups with and those without the antagonist at days 0, 1, 2, and 3 and either day 5 for blossoms or day 6 for fruits and leaves. Strain TS-15 exhibited broad-range antimicrobial activity against both major food-borne pathogens and major bacterial phytopathogens of tomato. After P. alvei strain TS-15 was applied onto the fruits, leaves, and blossoms of tomato plants, the concentration of S. Newport declined significantly (P ≤ 0.05) compared with controls. Astonishingly, >90% of the plants had no detectable levels of Salmonella by day 5 for blossoms. The naturally occurring antagonist strain TS-15 is highly effective in reducing the carriage of Salmonella Newport on whole tomato plants. The application of P. alvei strain TS-15 is a promising approach for reducing the risk of Salmonella contamination during tomato production.

PMID:
24747888
PMCID:
PMC4054204
DOI:
10.1128/AEM.00835-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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