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J Vis Exp. 2014 Apr 8;(86). doi: 10.3791/51076.

Shock wave application to cell cultures.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Innsbruck Medical University; johannes.holfeld@uki.at.
2
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Innsbruck Medical University.
3
Clinic of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy, Goethe-University Hospital.

Abstract

Shock waves nowadays are well known for their regenerative effects. Basic research findings showed that shock waves do cause a biological stimulus to target cells or tissue without any subsequent damage. Therefore, in vitro experiments are of increasing interest. Various methods of applying shock waves onto cell cultures have been described. In general, all existing models focus on how to best apply shock waves onto cells. However, this question remains: What happens to the waves after passing the cell culture? The difference of the acoustic impedance of the cell culture medium and the ambient air is that high, that more than 99% of shock waves get reflected! We therefore developed a model that mainly consists of a Plexiglas built container that allows the waves to propagate in water after passing the cell culture. This avoids cavitation effects as well as reflection of the waves that would otherwise disturb upcoming ones. With this model we are able to mimic in vivo conditions and thereby gain more and more knowledge about how the physical stimulus of shock waves gets translated into a biological cell signal ("mechanotransduction").

PMID:
24747842
PMCID:
PMC4165283
DOI:
10.3791/51076
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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