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Physiol Behav. 2014 May 28;131:68-74. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.04.021. Epub 2014 Apr 18.

Inhalation of coriander volatile oil increased anxiolytic-antidepressant-like behaviors and decreased oxidative status in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Gr. T. Popa", 16 University Str., Iasi 700117, Romania.
2
Department of Biology, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol I, No.11, Iasi 700506, Romania. Electronic address: hritcu@uaic.ro.
3
Department of Biology, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol I, No.11, Iasi 700506, Romania.

Abstract

The present study analyzed the possible anxiolytic, antidepressant and antioxidant proprieties of inhaled coriander volatile oil extracted from Coriandrum sativum var. microcarpum in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of inhaled coriander volatile oil were studied by means of in vivo (elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using catalase specific activity and the total content of the reduced glutathione. The beta-amyloid (1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of the locomotor activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming and immobility times within forced swimming test. Exposure to coriander volatile oil significantly improved these parameters, suggesting anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects. Moreover, coriander volatile oil decreased catalase activity and increased glutathione level in the hippocampus. Our results suggest that multiple exposures to coriander volatile oil can be useful as a mean to counteract anxiety, depression and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Beta-amyloid (1–42); Coriander volatile oil; Depression; Oxidative stress

PMID:
24747275
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.04.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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