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Sci Total Environ. 2014 Jul 1;485-486:575-587. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.03.123. Epub 2014 Apr 17.

The thermal consequences of river-level variations in an urban groundwater body highly affected by groundwater heat pumps.

Author information

1
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Zaragoza, c/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain; GHS, Institute of Environmental Assessment & Water Research (IDAEA), CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: agargil@unizar.es.
2
GHS, Institute of Environmental Assessment & Water Research (IDAEA), CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona, Spain.
3
Instituto Geológico y Minero de España (IGME), C/Manuel Lasala no. 44, 9° B, 50006 Zaragoza, Spain.
4
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Zaragoza, c/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain.

Abstract

The extensive implementation of ground source heat pumps in urban aquifers is an important issue related to groundwater quality and the future economic feasibility of existent geothermal installations. Although many cities are in the immediate vicinity of large rivers, little is known about the thermal river-groundwater interaction at a kilometric-scale. The aim of this work is to evaluate the thermal impact of river water recharges induced by flood events into an urban alluvial aquifer anthropogenically influenced by geothermal exploitations. The present thermal state of an urban aquifer at a regional scale, including 27 groundwater heat pump installations, has been evaluated. The thermal impacts of these installations in the aquifer together with the thermal impacts from "cold" winter floods have also been spatially and temporally evaluated to ensure better geothermal management of the aquifer. The results showed a variable direct thermal impact from 0 to 6 °C depending on the groundwater-surface water interaction along the river trajectory. The thermal plumes far away from the riverbed also present minor indirect thermal impacts due to hydraulic gradient variations.

KEYWORDS:

GSHP; GWHP; Groundwater; River–groundwater interaction; Thermal impact; Thermal management; Urban aquifer

PMID:
24747249
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.03.123
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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