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Lancet Infect Dis. 2014 Jul;14(7):640-9. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(14)70001-5. Epub 2014 Apr 17.

HIV and schistosomiasis co-infection in African children.

Author information

1
Department of Parasitology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK.
2
Center for Global Health and Diseases, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
3
Liverpool Pharmacometrics Group, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
4
School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
5
Department of Production and Population Health, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK.
6
Department of Parasitology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: jrstoth@liverpool.ac.uk.

Abstract

HIV/AIDS and schistosomiasis both cause a substantial disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa and the two diseases often overlap in their epidemiological characteristics. Although disease-specific control interventions are continuing, potential synergies in the control efforts for these two diseases have not been investigated. With a focus on children with schistosomiasis, we assess the risk for increased HIV transmission, HIV progression, and impaired response to drugs when given alongside HIV interventions. A new research agenda tailored to children is needed to better understand the interactions of these two diseases and the potential for combined responses.

PMID:
24747019
DOI:
10.1016/S1473-3099(14)70001-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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