Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2014 Jul;28(3):266-70. doi: 10.1016/j.jtemb.2014.03.003. Epub 2014 Mar 16.

BMI and levels of zinc, copper in hair, serum and urine of Turkish male patients with androgenetic alopecia.

Author information

1
Sutcuimam University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Kahramanmaras, Turkey. Electronic address: drperihanozturk@hotmail.com.
2
Sutcuimam University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, Kahramanmaras, Turkey. Electronic address: ergulkurutas@gmail.com.
3
Konya Education Research Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Konya, Turkey. Electronic address: arzuataseven@hotmail.com.
4
Sutcuimam University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Kahramanmaras, Turkey. Electronic address: nesli_dokur@hotmail.com.
5
Fatih University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Istanbul, Turkey. Electronic address: yakupgumusalan@hotmail.com.
6
Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, Mersin, Turkey. Electronic address: aysegulgorur@hotmail.com.
7
Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, Mersin, Turkey. Electronic address: lutamer@gmail.com.
8
Gaziantep University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Turkey. Electronic address: serhatinaloz@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Male pattern androgenetic alopecia is characterized by progressive hair loss from the scalp. It is known that imbalances of some trace elements play a role in the pathomechanism of many forms of alopecia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of zinc and copper in hair, serum and urine samples of Turkish males with male pattern androgenetic alopecia and to compare with healthy controls.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

116 males with male pattern androgenetic alopecia and 100 controls were involved in this study.

RESULTS:

Levels of zinc and copper in hair were decreased significantly in the patients (p<0.05), although zinc and copper levels of serum and urine were not different between patients and controls (p>0.05). Body mass index of patients were higher than control group. In addition, in the group with body mass index of 25 and lower zinc level in hair and urine, copper level in serum were significantly higher (p<0.05). Body mass index was negatively correlated with hair zinc levels.

CONCLUSION:

We thought that decreased zinc and copper levels in hair may play a role in the etiology of male pattern androgenetic alopecia. In addition, obesity by making changes in the balance of the trace elements in hair, serum and urine may play a role in male pattern androgenetic alopecia. Hence, assessing the levels of trace elements in hair of male pattern androgenetic alopecia patients may be more valuable compared to serum and urine for treatment planning.

KEYWORDS:

Androgenetic alopecia; Body fluids; Body mass index; Hair; Zinc and copper

PMID:
24746780
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtemb.2014.03.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center