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Neuron. 2014 May 7;82(3):670-81. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.03.013. Epub 2014 Apr 17.

Slow and fast γ rhythms coordinate different spatial coding modes in hippocampal place cells.

Author information

1
Center for Learning and Memory, 1 University Station Stop C7000, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA; Institute for Neuroscience, 1 University Station Stop C7000, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA.
2
Center for Learning and Memory, 1 University Station Stop C7000, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA.
3
Center for Learning and Memory, 1 University Station Stop C7000, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA; Institute for Neuroscience, 1 University Station Stop C7000, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA. Electronic address: colgin@mail.clm.utexas.edu.

Abstract

Previous work has hinted that prospective and retrospective coding modes exist in hippocampus. Prospective coding is believed to reflect memory retrieval processes, whereas retrospective coding is thought to be important for memory encoding. Here, we show in rats that separate prospective and retrospective modes exist in hippocampal subfield CA1 and that slow and fast gamma rhythms differentially coordinate place cells during the two modes. Slow gamma power and phase locking of spikes increased during prospective coding; fast gamma power and phase locking increased during retrospective coding. Additionally, slow gamma spikes occurred earlier in place fields than fast gamma spikes, and cell ensembles retrieved upcoming positions during slow gamma and encoded past positions during fast gamma. These results imply that alternating slow and fast gamma states allow the hippocampus to switch between prospective and retrospective modes, possibly to prevent interference between memory retrieval and encoding.

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PMID:
24746420
PMCID:
PMC4109650
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2014.03.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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