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Thromb Res. 2014 Aug;134(2):426-32. doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2014.03.054. Epub 2014 Apr 4.

Influence of coronary artery disease-associated genetic variants on risk of venous thromboembolism.

Author information

1
Coagulation Unit, Hematology Centre, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Sweden; Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: rona.strawbridge@ki.se.
3
INSERM, UMR_S 1166, Team Genomics & Pathophysiology of Cardiovascular Diseases, F-75013, Paris, France; ICAN Institute for Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, F-75013, Paris, France; Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR_S 1166, F-75013, Paris, France.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA.
5
Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
7
Molecular Medicine and Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
8
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Group Health Research Institute, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle WA USA; Seattle Epidemiologic Research and Information Center, Veterans Affairs Office of Research and Development, Seattle WA 98101, USA.
9
Inserm UMR 1062, Marseille, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France.
10
Coagulation Unit, Hematology Centre, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Sweden; Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Science for Life Laboratory Stockholm, Department of Proteomics, School of Biotechnology, KTH, Solna, Sweden.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

We investigated whether genetic variations robustly associated with coronary artery disease are also associated with risk of venous thromboembolism in a well-defined, female case-control study (n=2753) from Sweden.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

39 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 32 loci associated with coronary artery disease in genome-wide association studies were identified in a literature search and genotyped in the ThromboEmbolism Hormone Study (TEHS). Association with venous thromboembolism was assessed by logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Only rs579459 in the ABO locus demonstrated a significant association with VTE. A tentative association between ANRIL and VTE in the discovery analysis failed to replicate in a meta-analysis of 4 independent cohorts (total n=7181).

CONCLUSIONS:

It appears that only the ABO locus is a shared risk factor for coronary artery disease and VTE.

KEYWORDS:

ABO; ANRIL; Coronary artery disease; Genetics; Venous thromboembolism

PMID:
24745723
DOI:
10.1016/j.thromres.2014.03.054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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