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Vet Microbiol. 2014 Jun 25;171(1-2):153-9. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.03.023. Epub 2014 Mar 30.

Distribution of Capnocytophaga canimorsus in dogs and cats with genetic characterization of isolates.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Osaka City Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences, 8-34 Tojo-cho, Tennoji-ku, Osaka 543-0026, Japan. Electronic address: kaor-umeda@city.osaka.lg.jp.
2
Osaka Municipal Animal Care and Control Center, 2-5-74, Shibatani, Suminoe-ku, Osaka 559-0021, Japan.
3
Department of Microbiology, Osaka City Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences, 8-34 Tojo-cho, Tennoji-ku, Osaka 543-0026, Japan.
4
Department of International Health, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, 1-12-4, Sakamoto, Nagasaki-shi, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan.

Abstract

Capnocytophaga canimorsus, which is often found in the oral cavities of dogs and cats, is sometimes transmitted to humans, causing severe infection. To elucidate the risk of C. canimorsus in humans and animals, this study was undertaken to characterize this bacterium epidemiologically and genetically. We examined the distribution of C. canimorsus in dogs and cats, and analyzed the correlation between the presence of bacteria and individual factors statistically. We also compared C. canimorsus isolates genetically using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). C. canimorsus was detected in 76 of 109 dogs (69.7%) and 57 of 104 cats (54.8%). A relation between C. canimorsus presence and some individual factors was detected both in dogs and cats, but the predictive factors of carrying the bacterium differed between dogs and cats. 16S rRNA gene sequences from C. canimorsus isolates in this study were combined with previously published sequences to assess their intra-specific phylogeny. Results show that C. canimorsus is classifiable into two main groups (I and II) with differing γ-glutamyl aminopeptidase activity. Strains from human patients belonged unevenly to group I, possibility suggesting that group I can be transmitted to humans and group II is indigenous only to the oral cavities of dogs and cats. PFGE genotyping showed high discriminatory power, and the dendrogram accorded with genetic segregation between isolates of group I and II. Sma I-digest PFGE developed for this study is useful as a molecular typing method for additional epidemiological and phylogenetic studies of C. canimorsus.

KEYWORDS:

Capnocytophaga canimorsus; Distribution; Phylogenetic analysis; Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE); Zoonosis

PMID:
24745627
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.03.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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