Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:741465. doi: 10.1155/2014/741465. Epub 2014 Mar 13.

MicroRNAs in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: novel biomarkers and prognostic tools during the transition from steatosis to hepatocarcinoma.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Oncology, Francesco Balsano Foundation, 00198 Rome, Italy.
2
Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Oncology, Francesco Balsano Foundation, 00198 Rome, Italy ; Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Sapienza University of Rome, 00161 Rome, Italy.

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a metabolic-related disorder ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis, which may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The influence of NAFLD on HCC development has drawn attention in recent years. HCC is one of the most common malignant tumors and the third highest cause of cancer-related death. HCC is frequently diagnosed late in the disease course, and patient's prognosis is usually poor. Early diagnosis and identification of the correct stage of liver damage during NAFLD progression can contribute to more effective therapeutic interventions, improving patient outcomes. Therefore, scientists are always searching for new sensitive and reliable markers that could be analysed through minimally invasive tests. MicroRNAs are short noncoding RNAs that act as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. Several studies identified specific miRNA expression profiles associated to different histological features of NAFLD. Thus, miRNAs are receiving growing attention as useful noninvasive diagnostic markers to follow the progression of NAFLD and to identify novel therapeutic targets. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the miRNAs involved in NAFLD and related HCC development, highlighting their diagnostic and prognostic value for the screening of NAFLD patients.

PMID:
24745023
PMCID:
PMC3972908
DOI:
10.1155/2014/741465
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Hindawi Publishing Corporation Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center