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PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2014 Apr 17;8(4):e2769. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002769. eCollection 2014 Apr.

Air travel is associated with intracontinental spread of dengue virus serotypes 1-3 in Brazil.

Author information

1
Centro de Inovação Tecnológica, Instituto Evandro Chagas, Ananindeua, Brazil.
2
Center for Genomic Sciences, United States Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases, Frederick, Maryland, United States of America; Center for Infection and Immunity, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States of America.
3
Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
4
Departamento de Arbovirologia e Febres Hemorrágicas, Instituto Evandro Chagas, Ananindeua, Brazil.
5
Center for Infection and Immunity, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States of America.
6
Department of Biomathematics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America; Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America; Department of Biostatistics, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.
7
Departamento de Arbovirologia e Febres Hemorrágicas, Instituto Evandro Chagas, Ananindeua, Brazil; Universidade do Estado do Pará, Belém, Pará, Brazil.

Abstract

Dengue virus and its four serotypes (DENV-1 to DENV-4) infect 390 million people and are implicated in at least 25,000 deaths annually, with the largest disease burden in tropical and subtropical regions. We investigated the spatial dynamics of DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-3 in Brazil by applying a statistical framework to complete genome sequences. For all three serotypes, we estimated that the introduction of new lineages occurred within 7 to 10-year intervals. New lineages were most likely to be imported from the Caribbean region to the North and Northeast regions of Brazil, and then to disperse at a rate of approximately 0.5 km/day. Joint statistical analysis of evolutionary, epidemiological and ecological data indicates that aerial transportation of humans and/or vector mosquitoes, rather than Aedes aegypti infestation rates or geographical distances, determine dengue virus spread in Brazil.

PMID:
24743730
PMCID:
PMC3990485
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0002769
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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