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J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2014 Jun;34(3):313-7. doi: 10.1097/JCP.0000000000000099.

Treatment outcomes of depression: the pharmacogenomic research network antidepressant medication pharmacogenomic study.

Author information

1
From the Departments of *Psychiatry and Psychology, and †Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; ‡Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York Presbyterian-Allen Hospital, New York, NY; §US Department of Defense, Department of Behavioral Health, Heidelberg, Germany; ∥Department of Psychiatry, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa, IA; and Departments of ¶Information Technology, and #Molecular Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Erratum in

  • J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2014 Oct;34(5):558.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The effectiveness of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) is controversial.

AIMS:

The clinical outcomes of subjects with nonpsychotic MDD were reported and compared with the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study outcomes to provide guidance on the effectiveness of SSRIs.

METHODS:

Subjects were treated with citalopram/escitalopram for up to 8 weeks. Depression was measured using the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Clinician Rated (QIDS-C16) and the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale.

RESULTS:

The group of subjects with at least 1 follow-up visit had a remission (QIDS-C16 ≤ 5) rate of 45.8% as well as a response (50% reduction in QIDS-C16) rate of 64.8%, and 79.9% achieved an improvement of 5 points or higher in QIDS-C16 score. The Pharmacogenomic Research Network Antidepressant Medication Pharmacogenomic Study subjects were more likely to achieve a response than STAR*D study subjects. After adjustment for demographic factors, the response rates were not significantly different. When reporting the adverse effect burden, 60.5% of the subjects reported no impairment, 31.7% reported a minimal-to-mild impairment, and 7.8% reported a moderate-to-severe burden at the 4-week visit.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients contemplating initiating an SSRI to treat their MDD can anticipate a high probability of symptom improvement (79.9%) with a low probability that their symptoms will become worse. Patients with lower baseline severity have a higher probability of achieving remission. The Pharmacogenomic Research Network Antidepressant Medication Pharmacogenomic Study replicates many findings of the first phase of the STAR*D study after controlling for the differences between the studies.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00613470.

PMID:
24743713
PMCID:
PMC3992481
DOI:
10.1097/JCP.0000000000000099
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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