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Clin Breast Cancer. 2014 Oct;14(5):371-7. doi: 10.1016/j.clbc.2014.02.008. Epub 2014 Mar 1.

Outcome of male breast cancer: a matched single-institution series.

Author information

1
Division of Medical Senology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: monica.iorfida@ieo.it.
2
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; Department of Statistics and Quantitative Methods, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.
3
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.
4
Division of Medical Senology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.
5
Division of Prevention and Genetics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.
6
Division of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; University of Milan School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.
7
Division of Senology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; University of Milan School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.
8
Division of Senology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.
9
Scientific Direction, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Breast cancer occurs rarely in men, accounting for approximately 1% of all breast carcinomas. Data on prognosis principally derive from retrospective studies and from extrapolation of female breast cancer series.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A total of 99 men with invasive breast cancer were matched with 198 women with breast cancer who had surgery at the same institution from 1999 to 2010. Matching variables were year of surgery, age, primary tumor size, nodal involvement, hormone receptor status, status of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [ERBB2]), Ki-67, and grade. Median follow-up was 8.6 years.

RESULTS:

Disease-free survival (DFS) was significantly poorer in the men (10-year DFS, 51.7% vs. 66.5%; hazard ratio [HR], 1.79; 95% CI, 1.19-2.68; P = .004). Similar results were observed for overall survival (OS) (10-year OS, 70.7% vs. 84.2%; HR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.01-3.15; P = .043). The cumulative incidence of death for causes not related to the primary breast cancer was significantly higher for men than for women (HR, 2.87; 95% CI, 1.58-5.22; P = .001), whereas the breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was similar between the 2 groups (10-year BCSS, 81.5% vs. 88%; HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 0.62-2.59; P = .517).

CONCLUSION:

This comparative series found that men with breast cancer had a poorer DFS and OS when compared with women. The men also had a higher risk of contralateral tumors and second primaries. Appropriate counseling, surveillance, and prevention are recommended to improve survival for these individuals.

KEYWORDS:

Counseling; Men; Prevention; Second primaries; Survival

PMID:
24742826
DOI:
10.1016/j.clbc.2014.02.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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