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Toxicol Lett. 2014 Jul 3;228(1):56-66. doi: 10.1016/j.toxlet.2014.04.001. Epub 2014 Apr 15.

Lithocholic acid feeding results in direct hepato-toxicity independent of neutrophil function in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, Kansas University Medical Center, USA.
2
Department of Pathology, St. David's North Austin Medical Center, Austin, TX 78756, USA.
3
Research Unit for Experimental and Molecular Hepatology, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Graz, Austria; Department of Pathology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
4
Hans Popper Laboratory of Molecular Hepatology, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
5
Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, Kansas University Medical Center, USA. Electronic address: hjaeschke@kumc.edu.

Abstract

Lithocholic acid (LCA) supplementation in the diet results in intrahepatic cholestasis and bile infarcts. Previously we showed that an innate immune response is critical for cholestatic liver injury in the bile duct ligated mice. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the role of neutrophils in the mechanism of liver injury caused by feeding mice a diet containing LCA. C57BL/6 mice were given control or 1% LCA containing diet for 24-96 h and then examined for parameters of hepatotoxicity. Plasma ALT levels were significantly increased by 48 h after LCA feeding, which correlated with both neutrophil recruitment to the liver and upregulation of numerous pro-inflammatory genes. The injury was confirmed by histology. Deficiency in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression or inhibition of neutrophil function failed to protect against the injury. Bile acid levels were quantified in plasma and bile of LCA-fed mice after 48 and 96 h. Only the observed biliary levels of taurochenodeoxycholic acid and potentially tauro-LCA caused direct cytotoxicity in mouse hepatocytes. These data support the conclusion that neutrophil recruitment occurs after the onset of bile acid-induced necrosis in LCA-fed animals, and is not a primary mechanism of cell death when cholestasis occurs through accumulation of hydrophobic bile acids.

KEYWORDS:

Bile acid hepatotoxicity; Cholestasis; Innate immunity; Lithocholic acid; Neutrophils

PMID:
24742700
PMCID:
PMC4057375
DOI:
10.1016/j.toxlet.2014.04.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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