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J Proteome Res. 2014 May 2;13(5):2370-80. doi: 10.1021/pr4011684. Epub 2014 Apr 17.

Protein-to-mRNA ratios are conserved between Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

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1
Center for Systems and Synthetic Biology, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin , 2500 Speedway, Austin, Texas 78712, United States.

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that the concentrations of proteins expressed from orthologous genes are often conserved across organisms and to a greater extent than the abundances of the corresponding mRNAs. However, such studies have not distinguished between evolutionary (e.g., sequence divergence) and environmental (e.g., growth condition) effects on the regulation of steady-state protein and mRNA abundances. Here, we systematically investigated the transcriptome and proteome of two closely related Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, PAO1 and PA14, under identical experimental conditions, thus controlling for environmental effects. For 703 genes observed by both shotgun proteomics and microarray experiments, we found that the protein-to-mRNA ratios are highly correlated between orthologous genes in the two strains to an extent comparable to protein and mRNA abundances. In spite of this high molecular similarity between PAO1 and PA14, we found that several metabolic, virulence, and antibiotic resistance genes are differentially expressed between the two strains, mostly at the protein but not at the mRNA level. Our data demonstrate that the magnitude and direction of the effect of protein abundance regulation occurring after the setting of mRNA levels is conserved between bacterial strains and is important for explaining the discordance between mRNA and protein abundances.

PMID:
24742327
PMCID:
PMC4012837
DOI:
10.1021/pr4011684
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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