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J Virol. 2014 Jul;88(13):7663-7. doi: 10.1128/JVI.00285-14. Epub 2014 Apr 16.

Expanded host diversity and geographic distribution of hantaviruses in sub-Saharan Africa.

Author information

1
Departments of Pediatrics and Tropical Medicine, Medical Microbiology, and Pharmacology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.
2
Science and Education, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
3
Department of Biological Sciences and Museum of Natural Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA.
4
Departments of Pediatrics and Tropical Medicine, Medical Microbiology, and Pharmacology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ryanagih@hawaii.edu.

Abstract

The recent discovery of hantaviruses in shrews and bats in West Africa suggests that other genetically distinct hantaviruses exist in East Africa. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of newfound hantaviruses, detected in archival tissues from the Geata mouse shrew (Myosorex geata) and Kilimanjaro mouse shrew ( Myosorex zinki) captured in Tanzania, expands the host diversity and geographic distribution of hantaviruses and suggests that ancestral shrews and/or bats may have served as the original mammalian hosts of primordial hantaviruses.

PMID:
24741077
PMCID:
PMC4054438
DOI:
10.1128/JVI.00285-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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