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PLoS One. 2014 Apr 16;9(4):e94153. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0094153. eCollection 2014.

Population-level correlates of preterm delivery among black and white women in the U.S.

Author information

1
Division of Neonatology and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America.
2
General Medical Disciplines, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examined the ability of social, demographic, environmental and health-related factors to explain geographic variability in preterm delivery among black and white women in the US and whether these factors explain black-white disparities in preterm delivery.

METHODS:

We examined county-level prevalence of preterm delivery (20-31 or 32-36 weeks gestation) among singletons born 1998-2002. We conducted multivariable linear regression analysis to estimate the association of selected variables with preterm delivery separately for each preterm/race-ethnicity group.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of preterm delivery varied two- to three-fold across U.S. counties, and the distributions were strikingly distinct for blacks and whites. Among births to blacks, regression models explained 46% of the variability in county-level risk of delivery at 20-31 weeks and 55% for delivery at 32-36 weeks (based on R-squared values). Respective percentages for whites were 67% and 71%. Models included socio-environmental/demographic and health-related variables and explained similar amounts of variability overall.

CONCLUSIONS:

Much of the geographic variability in preterm delivery in the US can be explained by socioeconomic, demographic and health-related characteristics of the population, but less so for blacks than whites.

PMID:
24740117
PMCID:
PMC3989227
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0094153
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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