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BMC Womens Health. 2014 Apr 16;14:59. doi: 10.1186/1472-6874-14-59.

Experiences of barriers and facilitators to weight-loss in a diet intervention - a qualitative study of women in northern Sweden.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. anne.hammarstrom@umu.se.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a lack of research about the experiences of participating in weight-reducing interventions. The aim of this study was to explore barriers and facilitators to weight-loss experienced by participants in a diet intervention for middle-aged to older women in the general population in Northern Sweden.

METHOD:

In the intervention the women were randomised to eat either a Palaeolithic-type diet or a diet according to Nordic Nutrition recommendations for 24 months. A strategic selection was made of women from the two intervention groups as well as from the drop-outs in relation to social class, civil status and age. Thematic structured interviews were performed with twelve women and analysed with qualitative content analyses.

RESULTS:

The results showed that the women in the dietary intervention experienced two main barriers - struggling with self (related to difficulties in changing food habits, health problems, lack of self-control and insecurity) and struggling with implementing the diet (related to social relations and project-related difficulties) - and two main facilitators- striving for self-determination (related to having clear goals) and receiving support (from family/friends as well as from the project) - for weight-loss. There was a greater emphasis on barriers than on facilitators.

CONCLUSION:

It is important to also include drop-outs from diet interventions in order to fully understand barriers to weight-loss. A gender-relational approach can bring new insights into understanding experiences of barriers to weight-loss.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials gov NCT00692536.

PMID:
24739099
PMCID:
PMC3998240
DOI:
10.1186/1472-6874-14-59
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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