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Nat Rev Microbiol. 2014 May;12(5):341-54. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro3244.

A versatile framework for microbial engineering using synthetic non-coding RNAs.

Author information

1
1] University of California San Francisco Center for Systems and Synthetic Biology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94158, USA. [2] Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94158, USA. [3] California Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research, San Francisco, California 94158, USA.
2
1] California Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research, San Francisco, California 94158, USA. [2] Department of Bioengineering, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. [3] Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.

Abstract

Synthetic non-coding RNAs have emerged as a versatile class of molecular devices that have a diverse range of programmable functions, including signal sensing, gene regulation and the modulation of molecular interactions. Owing to their small size and the central role of Watson-Crick base pairing in determining their structure, function and interactions, several distinct types of synthetic non-coding RNA regulators that are functional at the DNA, mRNA and protein levels have been experimentally characterized and computationally modelled. These engineered devices can be incorporated into genetic circuits, enabling the more efficient creation of complex synthetic biological systems. In this Review, we summarize recent progress in engineering synthetic non-coding RNA devices and their application to genetic and cellular engineering in a broad range of microorganisms.

PMID:
24736794
DOI:
10.1038/nrmicro3244
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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