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PLoS One. 2014 Apr 15;9(4):e95048. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0095048. eCollection 2014.

Meat consumption and risk of oral cavity and oropharynx cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

Author information

1
Department of Gynecology, The Affiliated Hospital of Jining Medical University, Jining, Shandong Province, People's Republic China.
2
Department of ENT, The Affiliated Hospital of Jining Medical University, Jining, Shandong Province, People's Republic China.
3
Department of Physiology, Jining Medical University, Jining, Shandong Province, People's Republic China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

High meat consumption, especially red and processed meat consumption is associated with an increased risk of several cancers, however, evidence for oral cavity and oropharynx cancer is limited. Thus, we performed this meta-analysis to determine the association between intakes of total meat, processed meat, red meat, and white meat, and the risk of oral cavity and oropharynx cancer.

METHODS:

Electronic search of Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Library Central database was conducted to select relevant studies. Fixed-effect and random-effect models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Potential sources of heterogeneity were detected by meta-regression. Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were also performed.

RESULTS:

12 case-control studies and one cohort study were included in the analyses, including 501,730 subjects and 4,104 oral cavity and oropharynx cancer cases. Pooled results indicated that high consumption of total meat, red meat, and white meat were not significantly associated with increased risk of oral cavity and oropharynx cancer (RR = 1.14, 95% CI[0.78-1.68]; RR = 1.05, 95% CI[0.66, 1.66] and RR = 0.81, 95% CI[0.54, 1.22], respectively), while the high consumption of processed meat was significantly associated with a 91% increased risk of oral cavity and oropharynx cancer (RR = 1.91, 95% CI [1.19-3.06]). Sensitivity analysis indicated that no significant variation in combined RR by excluding any of the study, confirming the stability of present results.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present meta-analysis suggested that high consumption of processed meat was significantly associated with an increased risk of oral cavity and oropharynx cancer, while there was no significantly association between total meat, red meat or white meat and the risk of oral cavity and oropharynx cancer. More prospective cohort studies are warranted to confirm these associations.

PMID:
24736706
PMCID:
PMC3988178
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0095048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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